Sisters

Poetry
Angela Inez Vargas


Photo Credit: purplegirlalyssa/Flickr (CC-by-nc)

Photo Credit: purplegirlalyssa/Flickr (CC-by-nc)

Her long black hair sticking down
to the waist. We could be sisters.

She looks the strong, silent stock and
hard up for self-service, just like I was once.

Her teeth look as untarnished as spring’s carefree song,
I bet she smiles diamonds that light up your world.

But a scarlet residue sticks to my skin,
long-soiled and steeped in your scandal.

Your chopped beef squirms dumb questions
Like washing out the daggers you once flew.

You want to know how I’ve been?
I pawned everything, except these pearls

the shop owner said were worthless.
I also learned to kill and start over on command.

Twisted polish until my soul shined,
Your moonshine slime was only the beginning.

And, oh, how I dreamt of seeing you this high,
two lofty towers regurgitating lies and

framed at the altar of your lovely defeat.
And this freedom I cling to, once dear to us both,

still creeps in your loins, once mine, but never enough
to spread sweetness on your finger-heavy grip

as you pushed it all down to please your own girth.
Oh, how I clawed my way out of your words.

What I wanted to say is that you look loved,
Cherished, honored and maybe even obeyed.

And how I love the mirrored sameness of her face.

pencilAngela Inez Vargas has lived most of her life in Puerto Rico and is now pursuing a master’s degree in Comparative Literature and Translation studies in the New York area. A DIY enthusiast and filmophile, she speaks English and Spanish fluently but is passionate about French. Although most of her poetry and articles are in English, she is currently working on a collection of short stories in Spanish. Some of her writings and videos can be found here. Email: angela.vargaspr[at]gmail.com

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